Contributors

Issue 92
Pat Caplan is at the Department of Anthropology, Goldsmith College, London

Lawrence Cockcroft worked for Kilimo and TRDB in Tanzania from 1970 to 1972 and is a Trustee of the Tanzania Gatsby Trust. Gerald Belkin, was a video maker in Tanzania in the early 70’s. Ralph Ibbott was an Oxfam secondee to the Ruvuma Development Association at the time.

Michael Jennings is a Lecturer in Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). His research focuses on the history and politics of development processes and civil society in Tanzania, and on social aspects of health (including HIV and AIDS) in East Africa.

David Kelly has been involved with East African business for much of the past 33 years. He is currently a director of a Dar es Salaam based company, and is a book dealer with Africa as one of his speciality areas. Other interests include cricket and bird-watching, both with an East African content.

Peter Leonhardt has family connections with Tanzania through his parents, and has visited the Mtwara, Masasi and Rondo areas, and more recently the Serengeti region of the country. He is a technical manager in BT and has a keen interest in developing appropriate telecom systems for developing countries. He spoke at an International telecoms congress in London on this subject last year.

David and Jackie Morgan taught sciences at Minaki Secondary School during the late 1960s. Since 1991 both have been actively involved in promoting town twinning between Redditch in Worcestershire and Mtwara in south- east Tanzania, including the organisation of exchange visits.

Roger Payne for over 35 years has headed country and regional operations for multinational agricultural and consumer products corporations based in Asia, Middle East and throughout Africa. He is currently an advisor to a number of UK organisations seeking an overseas presence, and to foreign companies wishing to establish in the UK. He is a Vice-Patron of TradeAid, an NGO creating sustainable employment and business opportunities to a community in Southern Tanzania.

John Sankey was British High Commissioner in Tanzania from 1982 to 1985.

Issue 91
Elsbeth Joyce Court, who taught East African History at Machame Secondary School, is a lecturer on the Arts of Africa at SOAS, London. In 2006, she co-convened with Chris Spring the public forum MBILI: Visual Traditions of Eastern Africa at the British Museum.

Dr. Ashley Jackson, Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies, King’s College London at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, Defence Academy of the U.K.

Michael Jennings is a lecturer in development studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies. His research focuses on the history and politics of development processes and civil society in Tanzania, and on social aspects of health (including HIV and AIDS) in East Africa.

Joseph Kilasara is an ACCA Affiliate in London. He was formerly a surety bond underwriter with the National Insurance Corporation in Dar es Salaam.

Henry Kippin is research director at African Development Information Services, and an honorary fellow of the Political Economy Research Centre (PERC) at the University of Sheffield. His research in Tanzania has focused on politics and development in Tabora region.

Robert Wise
is a former District Officer in Tanzania.

Issue 90
Elsbeth Joyce Court, who began her teaching career at Machame Girls’ School Moshi, lectures on the arts of Africa at SOAS.
Michael Jennings is a lecturer in development studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). His research focuses on the history and politics of development processes and civil society in Tanzania, and on social aspects of health (including HIV and AIDS) in East Africa.
Joseph Kilasara is an ACCA Affiliate in London. He was formerly a surety bond underwriter with the National Insurance Corporation in Dar es Salaam.
Roger Nellist has been associated with Tanzania for the last 27 years. As an adviser in the Ministry of Water, Energy and Minerals in Dar es Salaam, he worked closely with Al Noor Kassum during 1981- 1986, and then continued to advise the Government when he was a Special Adviser at the Commonwealth Secretariat. From 2001, he has maintained links with Tanzania, working on the economic, investment and growth agendas at the UK Department for International Development in London
Patrick Wakely is Professor of Land Use Planning at University College.
Rob Wilson is the Director of READ International

Issue 89
Sir Mervyn Brown was British High Commissioner in Tanzania from 1975 to 1978.
Marion Doro is a political scientist with a focus on African affairs. In and out of Africa since 1960 when she was a Ford Fellow in Kenya, she is now the U.S.A. half of the two person reviews team of Tanzania Affairs.
Dick Eberlie was District Officer in Dar es Salaam, Kisarawe and Morogoro over the period of Independence. Subsequently he worked for the Tanzania Tea Growers Association and for the Confederation of British Industry in London and Brussels. Formerly Secretary of the Tanzania Society for the Blind and a member of the Editorial Board of the Tanzania Notes and Records. Author of “The German Achievement in East Africa”, he is now an adviser on industrial organisation and business representation with the British Executive Service Overseas (BESO).
Gloria Mawji is a local historian who has lived in Dar es Salaam for almost thirty years and taught at the International School of Tanganyika.
Dr William Rea is Lecturer in the School of Fine Art, History and Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds.
William Twining is a Professor Emeritus of University College London. He taught in the Faculty of Law in Dar-es-Salaam from 1961 to 1965.
Rob Wilson is Director of READ International.

Issue 88
John Cooke was a District Officer and later Education Officer in Tanganyika from 1951 to 1969, and thereafter served in Botswana until 1993, involved in the founding and development of the new University of Botswana.
Faye Cran’s late husband Derick was the General Manager of General Tyres in Arusha for many years. Faye herself has been involved actively in many projects from water, malaria, helping leprosy victims, to education. Her husband always said that when you are writing about yourself you should just cut it short. It should be like a mini skirt – long enough to cover the essentials but short enough to be interesting!
David Kelly has been involved with East African business for much of the last 33 years. He is currently a director of a Dar es Salaam based company and is a book dealer with Africa as one of his speciality areas. Other interests include cricket and bird-watching, both with an East African content.
Joseph Sabas is a business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.
Christine Lawrence was Bursar of Mahiwa Farm School from 1965 to 1971.
Dr Jim Watson spent 5 years in agricultural research in Tanzania in the 1960’s then 11 years in Swaziland working mainly on irrigated crops. He has been a consultant in agricultural development in Africa and Asia for the past 25 years.
Pru Watts-Russell was British Council Books & Libraries Officer in Tanzania from 1982 to 1987.
Dr Hildebrand Shayo is a policy research economist in London. He conducted research on natural resources management particularly timber for construction between 1997 and 2004 in Tanzania.
John Sankey was British High Commissioner in Tanzania from 1982 to 1985.

Issue 87
Jan Kees van Donge. Taught Political Science and Public Administration at UDSM 1982-89. Is now Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and Development Management at the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, Netherlands.

Emma Hunter is completing a PhD on the history of Nationalism and ethnicity in twentieth-century Tanzania at the University of Cambridge.

David Kelly has been involved with East African business for much of the last 33 years. He is currently a director of a Dar es Salaam-based company, and is a book dealer with Africa as one of his speciality areas. Other interests include cricket and bird-watching, both with an East African content

Joseph Kilasara is a Tanzanian business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.

Ben Rawlence is a consultant for Human Rights Watch. He was formerly political adviser to the Civic United Front.

Dr Hildebrand Shayo is a policy research economist in London. He conducted research on natural resources management, particularly timber for construction between 1997 and 2004

Dr Margaret Snyder has been involved with Tanzania since 1964 when she was advisor to Umoja wa Wanawake for Bibi Titi. She has been a regional advisor to UNECA and director of UNIFEM., and an election observer in Dar es Salaam in 1994. She received the first PhD degree awarded by the University of Dar es Salaam.

Peter White. Peter White studied Swahili at SOAS and taught in a Tanzanian secondary school.

Issue 86
Karl Aatun is a lecturer, writer and inventor on scientific themes. He was a lecturer at the Agricultural Training Institute at Ukiriguru, near Mwanza, in the late 1950’s before returning to Norway where, amongst other things, he has invented a new
balanced health food called ‘All in One’.

Siân Caldwell is currently working as a Community Development Dietetian in North Wales. She spent 7 months in Arusha working with WIA to address nutritional development issues. WIA has developed a nutritional booklet in Swahili, which can be obtained from Siân. The book addresses subjects such as nutrition, moringa and the management of symptoms of HIV.

Dr Hildebrand Shayo is a policy research economist in London. He conducted research on natural resources management particularly timber for construction between 1997 and 2004 in Tanzania.

Marion Doro, is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, New London, U.S.A. She was professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es Salaam in 1995.

Peter Hinchcliffe was deputy British High Commissioner in Dar es Salaam between 1978 and 1981.

Emma Hunter is completing a PhD on the history of nationalism and ethnicity in twentieth-century Tanzania at the University of Cambridge.

Joan Russell worked in the Tanzanian education service 1957 – 64 and was later a lecturer in Linguistics and Swahili at the University of York.

John Sutton was formerly Director of British Institute in East Africa (Nairobi), and Editor of their journal “Azania” for many years.

Kathleen Taylor was VSO Physics teacher (1996-9) helping to establish the Science/Maths department at Pallotti Secondary School for Girls at Siuyu, in Singida Region.

Issue 85
Paul Bjerk is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin. Assistant Lecturer in Communication Skills at Tumaini University 1998-2000. Currently working on a dissertation on Julius Nyerere.

Dr. James Brennan is Lecturer in East African History at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. His interests include urbanization in East Africa, race and nationalism, South Asian diaspora, Islam in East Africa.

Jane Bryce was born in Lindi in 1951 and grew up in Moshi. She worked as a freelance journalist both in London and while studying for a PhD in Nigeria in the 80s. Since 1992, she has taught African literature, film and creative writing at the University of the West Indies in Barbados.

Joyce Cutbush taught in Secondary schools in Tanzania between 1959 and 1971.

Marion Doro is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, New London, U.S.A. She was Professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es Salaam in 1995.

Joseph Kilasara is a Tanzanian business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.
Sauda Kilimanga is employed by Barrick Gold Tanzania. He is a presenter for ITV in Tanzania. He is also the leader of a choir!

Jim Read is Professor of Comparative Public Law in the University of London (SOAS). He was a senior Lecturer in Law at University College, Dar es Salaam in the 1960’s.

Issue 84

Paul Bjerk is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin. He was an Assistant Lecturer in communication skills at Tumaini University from 1998 to 2000. He is currently working on a dissertation on Julius Nyerere.

Jane Bryce was born in Lindi in 1951 and grew up in Moshi. She worked as a freelance journalist both in London and while studying for a PhD in Nigeria in the 80s. Since 1992, she has taught African literature, film and creative writing at the University of the West Indies in Barbados.

David Bowers is a Reader in Ocean Sciences at the University of Wales. He has many years’ experience visiting the east coast of Africa, teaching African students and carrying out research in coastal waters

Jacob Knight worked at Mazengo School, Dodoma, as a physics teacher from 1991 to 1994. He is now a consulting engineer with Ove Arup and partners in London and regularly visits Tanzania.

Tom Cadogan lives and works in Iringa. He has a doctorate in the educational history of Tanzania from the University of London.

Marion Doro, is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, New London, U.S.A. She was professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es Salaam in 1995.

Tom Fisher is researching for a PhD in politics and ethnicity in Tanzania. He is currently conducting fieldwork in Kilimanjaro Region.
Joseph Kilasara is a Tanzanian business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.
Professor Bob Moon is Professor of Education at the Open University.

Professor Jim Read. Emeritus Professor of Comparative Law, University of London (SOAS). Lecturer in Law at University College, Dar es Salaam in the 1960’s.

Dr Jim Watson spent 5 years in agricultural research in Tanzania in the 1960s then 11 years in Swaziland mainly on irrigated crops and has been a consultant in agricultural development in Africa and Asia for the past 25 years.

Issue 83

Daniel Brockington is a Lecturer at the Institute of Development Policy and Management at the University of Manchester with an ESRC fellowship to work on the social impacts of protected areas.

Ann Brumfit taught in Tabora and then at the University of Dar es Salaam. She visits periodically as a consultant in the teaching of English.

David Craig. Currently Missionary Programmes Officer for USPG, spent twenty years in the BBC, latterly as Head of Religious Broadcasting for the World Service. He worked in Tanzania as a VSO during Bishop Trevor’s episcopate and subsequently as Diocesan Administrator for the Diocese of Masasi

Marion Doro is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, New London U.S.A. She was Professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es Salaam in 1995.

Ron Fennell. Overseas Civil Service 1954 to 1966 in Sierra Leone. IMF 1966-1969. World Bank 1969 – 1995. He was the Bank’s Resident Representative in Tanzania from 1984 to 1987. Consultant to UNDP, DFID and NGO’s on disarmament and conflict resolution -1996 to 2002.

Joseph Kilasara is a Tanzanian business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.

John Sankey was British High Commissioner in Dar es Salaam, 1983-5.

Martin Walsh is a development consultant and Affiliated Lecturer in the Department of Social Anthropology in the University of Cambridge. He first went to Tanzania in 1980 to conduct research in Usangu.

Issue 82
Andrew Clayton has a doctorate in Social Anthropology for a study of the adoption of Christianity and Islam amongst Tanzanian Makonde. His study was based on field work in Newala District from February 1988 to December 1989. He currently works for Christian Aid as Regional Manager for South East Asia.

Marion Doro is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, New London U.S.A. She was Professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es Salaam in 1995.

Tony Goodchild is an animal scientist who worked from 1970 to 1984 in Tanzania – in Mpwapwa, Tarime and Tanga. Since then he has worked in the subtropics – Australia and Syria – and now works as an epidemiologist near Woking (a desk job with political wolves at the door!).
Joseph Kilasara is a Tanzanian business student at the London School of Management. He has also worked with the Tanzania National Insurance Corporation.
Henry Kippen is researching politics and development in Tabora region. He will be in Tanzania from August to November this year, and will also be working with a local Tabora NGO on health and education projects.

Dr Brian Mathew is a freelance water development specialist, and ex-Country Representative of WaterAid Tanzania.

Dr Christine Okali is a sociologist who has been involved with livestock and agro-forestry programmes in Tanzania. She is on the staff of the School of Development Studies at the University of East Anglia, Norwich.

John Sankey was British High Commissioner in Dar es Salaam, 1983-85.

Issue 81
Dr James Brennan is Lecturer in East African History at the School of Oriental and African studies, London. His interests include urbanisation in East Africa, race and nationalism, South Asian Diaspora, Islam in East Africa.

Karen Brown is currently working on a post-doctorate, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, which explores the development of veterinary science and its environmental ramifications in South Africa c1900-1950.

Janet Bujra taught at the University of Dar es Salaam in the early seventies and has carried out research on class formation, domestic service, gender and AIDS in Tanzania. She is currently an Honorary Reader in Sociology in the Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford.

David Craig The reviewer worked in the diocese of Masasi, first when Trevor was Bishop and later under his successor Hilary Chisonga. He spent two years as a novice at the Community of the Resurrection Mirfield before becoming Head of Religious Broadcasting for the BBC World Service. He currently works for USPG.

Marion E. Doro is Professor Emerita of Government at Connecticut College, new London U.S.A. She was Professor of Political Science at the University of Dar es salaam in 1995.

Ellen Kelly is the International Programme Manager for the Liberal Democrats. She has worked widely with political parties worldwide, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Central and Eastern Europe.

Jacob Knight worked at Mazengo School, Dodoma, as a physics teacher from 1991 to 1994. He is now a consulting engineer with Ove Arup and partners in London but regularly visits Tanzania.

Jim Read is Emeritus Professor of Comparative Public Law in the University of London (SOAS). He was Senior Lecturer in Law at University College, Dar s Salaam in the 1960s.

Joan Russell. Worked in the Tanzanian education service 1957 – 64 and was later a lecturer in Linguistics and Swahili at the University of York.

Hildebrand Shayo is a policy research economist in London. He conducted research on natural resource management, particularly timber for construction between 1997 and 2004 in Tanzania.

Issue 80
Ann Brumfit. Taught in Tabora and then at the University of Dar es Salaam. She visits Tanzania periodically as a consultant in the teaching of English.

David Holton. Son of tea planter Alan, who worked in the Usambaras and Tukuyu. Educated at Lushoto Prep School before returning to school in England. He is presently General Manager of Bookland in Chester and a regular reviewer for BBC and local radio.

Henry Kippin is a researcher at the University of Sheffield, although currently based in London. He will be in Tanzania next year, looking at how the election campaign is played out in Tabora region.

Christine Lawrence was the Bursar at Mahiwa Young Farmer’s Training Centre from 1965 to 1971. She was Treasurer of the Britain Tanzania Society for 20 years from 1975.

Dan Quille is a final year student in International Development and NGO management and also a trustee of Global Development Links.

Peg Snyder. Was Adviser to Bibi Titi and Umoja wa Wanawake in 1964, and subsequently Co-ordinator of the Syracuse University/Ford Foundation research project on Village settlements. She received the first ever PhD from the University of Dar es Salaam. She has also been Regional Adviser for UNECA and Director of UNIFEM. She was an Election Observer in Dar in 1995 and in Zanzibar in 2000.

Issue 25

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE
Professor A.H. BUNTING who is a consultant in tropical agricultural research and development, was Professor of Agricultural Development Overseas at Reading University from 1974-82. During the period of the Groundnut Scheme from 1947-51, he was Chief Scientific Officer to the Overseas Food Corporation.
Mr. MARTIN BURTON was born in Kenya and lived for a while in Moshi in the shadow of Mt. Kilimanjaro. He has climbed the mountain himself, but left his bicycle behind! He now lectures at the Institute of Irrigation Studies, Southampton University.
Mr. J. ROGER CARTER is the Vice-Chairman of the UK Chapter of the Britain-Tanzania Society. He served in Tanzania from 1967-74 as Advisor on Educational Planning
Mr. MEL CROFTON is an Industrial Training Advisor with the TETOC Group of the British Council, He has visited Tanzania several times in particular in connection with transportation projects.
Miss CHRISTINE LAWRENCE worked in Tanzania from 1968-71 as Bursar of the Mahiwa Farm School. Since then she has been working for the Society of Friends (the Quakers) in London.
Mr. A.F. LWAITAMA lectures in the Communication Skills Unit of the Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics at the University of Dar es Salaam,
Mr. MARTYN PENNINGTON works in the Commission of the European Communities and is responsible for the Community’s relations with Tanzania, including the administration of its aid programmes there. He previously worked in the Overseas Development Administration in London, which he joined after teaching English on voluntary service in Madagascar.